Got Questions? (Biblical)

Here’s my sermon from Sunday, July 26th. This opens the “Got Questions?” series. In the video, which will be available later in the week, we will include questions taken and answered during the sermon. This is only the part I prepared ahead of time.
Enjoy!GotQuesitonsLet’s start our “Got Questions” series with one of the few questions I’ve received.  I’ll offer something of an answer, then share some thoughts, then invite you to ask questions as well.

Ready? Here’s the first question for the series.  It starts at the very beginning; which, I’ve heard, is a very good place to start:

Did God make man on the sixth day (Genesis 1:27) or after the seventh day (Genesis 2:7)?

Well, now. That’s a question!  In case some of you had not noticed, Genesis seems to tell of God’s creating humans two different times. In Genesis 1, male and female are created together on the 6th day.  In Ch. 2, though, we get the longer version of the story: where first the man is created, and then woman is created out of Adam while he sleeps.

So, my answer to the question is: “yes.”  God created man and woman on the sixth day AND afterwards. Although, actually, the second story seems to indicate that the first human was created on the first day of creation.

If you read further into the second chapter of Genesis, you notice that only one human is created, and that human is created before the animals.

This might leave some of you wondering, “well, which one is right?”

Which is a great place to start this message, and, for that matter, a whole sermon series called “Got Questions?”

I am attempting to divide the questions over these three sermons in this way:  biblical, theological, and social.  There is lots of overlap; that’s ok.  This week, we look only at, or at least primarily at, biblical questions.  In a few minutes, I intend to give you the opportunity to ask some yourself.

Back to the “which one is right?” question.

Asking the question, “which one is right?” between two bible verses says a lot about the kind of people we are.

We are, or tend to be, people who want straightforward, clear-cut answers.  We want  no interpretation necessary.

The Bible does not offer straightforward, clear-cut answers.  In fact, I would go so far as to say the Bible REFUSES to offer straightforward, clear-cut answers.

It starts that way. Two different stories of creation in the first two chapters! The first is about God being the author of order, the second about God being our Creator

Before I pursue that any further, here’s what our church, the United Methodist Church, says about the Bible:

Article IV (EUB) We believe the Holy Bible, Old and New Testaments, reveals the Word of God so far as is necessary for our salvation. It is to be received through the Holy Spirit as the true guide for faith and practice. Whatever is not revealed in or established by the Holy Scriptures is not to be made an article of faith nor is it to be taught as essential to salvation.

This is NOT a “B I B L E stands for Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth” understanding of the Bible.

I don’t see how the Bible is an instruction book.  This takes us back to the way the world we live in works; the age we live in thinks: We want instructions. Even better than instructions, just google your “how to” question and watch any of 17 to 70,000 videos on Youtube for “how to” do whatever you want to learn how to do!

The Bible, in fact, is not a book at all. It is a collection – a library if you will – of 66 books written over the course of more than a millennium.

Or, if it is a book, it is a book that “reveals the Word of God so far as is necessary for our salvation. It is to be received through the Holy Spirit as the true guide for faith and practice.”

If the Bible were an instruction book, I expect Jesus would have answered questions differently!  Matthew 13, for example, is full of Jesus’ teaching about the Kingdom of God. To explain the Kingdom, instead of a set of marching orders to political dominance and enforcement of proper social behaviors, Jesus tells them
A farmer went out to scatter seed…
The Kingdom of heaven is like someone who planted good seed in his field. while people were sleeping, an enemy came in and planted weeds among the wheat…
The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed…
The kingdom of heaven is like yeast…
The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure that somebody hid in a field…
… is like merchant of fine pearls…
… is like a net that people threw into the lake and gathered all kinds of fish…

The vast majority of the Bible is narrative, or story. But, then, if the Bible reveals the Word of God so far as is necessary for our salvation. It is to be received through the Holy Spirit as the true guide for faith and practice, it makes sense that it is story; we LIVE IN STORY.

Think, for a minute, about what Jesus’ bible was.  Do you know what Bible Jesus read? Not only did Jesus NOT have an iphone or a tablet computer to carry around to look up scriptures, but he didn’t even have a book – a bound version – to carry around.  It is, in fact, very likely that Jesus did not own a copy of the Hebrew Bible – what we call the Old Testament, but in a different order.

It is most likely that Jesus learned what he learned about the Bible in school and from listening to adults talk about it.

The Bible, and what it says and what it means belongs to the community of the people who claim the Bible as their book; as authoritative in their lives.  We read it, collectively and individually, because we believe it reveals the Word of God as far as is necessary for our salvation.

And we must remember that reading it together is as important as reading it apart.  Each of the 66 books of the Bible was written more than 1000 years before the printing press, so there was no expectation of personal daily reading.

Our modern expectation of personal daily reading has sometimes replaced reading and wrestling with the scriptures together as God’s people.

Jewish culture in Jesus’ day, as now, I’m told, was full of discussion and debate about the stories that make up the scriptures. Here is a parable that expresses this value:

Two rabbis are arguing over a verse in the Torah, an argument that has gone on for over twenty years. In the parable God gets so annoyed by the endless discussion that he comes down and he tells them that he will reveal what it really means. However, right at this moment they respond by saying, “What right do you have to tell us what it means? You gave us the words, now leave us in peace to wrestle with them.”

So, Jesus learned from the Hebrew Bible, our Old Testament.  The Jewish faith also has the mishnah, writings of oral traditions from Rabbis interpreting the Hebrew Bible, as well as the Talmud, a written compendium of all of this.  The Talmud is 6200 pages long, and it is all about what the Bible means.

We believe the Holy Bible, Old and New Testaments, reveals the Word of God so far as is necessary for our salvation. But we don’t always use it that way!

Here is something else I feel it is important to say, then I’ll answer two more questions, then we’ll take some questions from you. There is no plain meaning, obvious, interpretation-free way to read the text.  Some preachers will tell you there is. In fact, isn’t it convenient that the one person who gets to stand in front and hog the microphone claims there is one meaning to a scripture.

That one true, plain, obvious meaning is, of course, mine. The one I’m telling you.

Except the Bible doesn’t work that way!

For example: Some still (amazingly to me!) throw out Paul’s “Let your women keep silent in the church” verse which seems, right(?), to have a pretty obvious meaning.  Except that Paul also writes that “There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus. (Gal 3:28)

Which is it? Well, I suppose that depends on what you intend the scripture to do.  If you intend to weaponize the bible, to use it “at” someone else to put them in their place or prove yourself right and them wrong, then you have to decide which it is.

If you are reading the Bible as revealing the Word of God so far as is necessary for our salvation,” then I suppose you’ll get a different answer to that question.

Do you ever read the Bible ‘at’ other people? Have you ever had the Bible read ‘at’ you?

The other question is this: “Is homosexuality immoral from a biblical standpoint?

Scripture interprets scripture.” Here is my answer: It seems that way to most people. However, even this, I am convinced, brings up more challenges than we want it to.  First off, as I’ve pointed out before, the bible NOWHERE mentions homosexuality as an orientation.  It does, in as many as 6 different places, refer to some forms of homosexual behavior.

Which leads me to this: Who is asking if “homosexuality is immoral from a biblical standpoint?”  Now, I know who asked the question, but that’s not what I mean.

Typically, it seems, confirmed, even adamantly heterosexual individuals ask if homosexuality is immoral. Sometimes they are curious, sometimes they intend to weaponize the scriptures.

Maybe more heterosexual folk ought to spend more time wondering if gossip is immoral than if homosexuality is immoral.

Most of us are probably following Jesus better if we question our own behaviors and motivations and attitudes than those of others.

The final question, before I take yours, is Christ said “my body GIVEN for you”, but in your serving of Communion you say “Jesus’ body BROKEN for you”.  Why do you do this?

Great question!  The first time I was asked this, I admit, I got a bit defensive.  I mean, I absolutely understood the question.  Isaiah and John both make it a point to say that the Savior’s atoning death would occur without the breaking of a bone.  Why, then, did I say, “Christ’s body, which is broken for you.”?

When I was first asked, I didn’t know why I do this.  It didn’t take me long, though, to find out.

I do this because the translation of 1 Corinthians 11:24 that I grew up with said “And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.” I say it this way because

  1. it’s in the Bible that way; and
  2. that’s the way I learned it when I was younger.

On this second point, I have a confession: I used to get really irritated when people would say, at the beginning of the Lord’s Prayer, “Our Father, WHO art in heaven….”  Because the King James CLEARLY says “Our Father, WHICH art in heaven….”

Each of us read the Bible the way we have learned to read the Bible, and not exactly the same way as others read the Bible. But we are invited to wrestle, struggle together WITH the Bible because it reveals the Word of God so far as is necessary for our salvation.

taking questions

Conclusion:

Josiah became King of Judah when he was 8 years old.  At 26, he determined the Temple would be renovated. Part of the clean up of the Temple for this project was the discovery of the “Covenant Scroll” – the torah.  When Josiah, the king heard it read, it broke his heart and he ripped his clothes – a cultural way of expressing deep sorrow, guilt, and grief.

The Word of God can have this effect on us.  When we use it only, or even mostly, against others, though, we build walls around our own selves. When we weaponize God’s word against others, we dull ourselves to experience the power God’s word can have in us.

Contrast this with Jesus calling out the Pharisees with the way they use the Bible.  They read some of it literally to the minutest detail, and then ignore other parts.  More accurately, they use some of God’s word to rationalize why they don’t have to obey other parts of God’s word.

So, what are we to do?  We all, like the pharisees, run the risk of using some parts of the Bible to trump others.  In fact, John Wesley taught his followers to interpret the more difficult to understand parts of the Bible in light of the more straightforward.  Or, perhaps, the more specific in terms of the broader.

For instance, how can Paul tell women to keep silent and also say that in Christ there is no male or female?

Because, clearly, one is more general, a broader, more universal reading, while the other is for some specific case.

We all interpret some parts of the Bible in terms of other parts.

It shows in the way we live.  When we use the Bible against others, we find others assuming a defensive posture when we dare bring up the Bible or religion.

When we use the Bible to help us and others connect with the God who has this incredible long tradition of faithful love and commitment to people created in his own image, I suspect we find people more willing to listen.

What about you would make someone want to read the Bible the way you do?

Closing Story:

I keep an old shoebox on the shelf in my closet.  I take it down every once in a while and look through it.  Usually, no more than once a year.  But when I do, I cherish it!

This shoebox is where I keep letters and cards from Rachel from when we were dating.  She lived in Fort Worth and I lived in McGregor.  We talked most every day, but in this kind of relationship, there was always more to be said.  So we wrote to each other. Rachel being more artistic than I also drew and painted on cards that she would send.

So, every so often I pull the box down and I read through them. It warms my heart and refreshes our relationship.

I feel like this is a pretty good image for what the Bible is or can be for us.  Think of it as love letters to God’s people.

May you find the life and hope and forgiveness and faithful love in the Bible that the Bible is meant to offer.  May you find it so clearly that you glow at the thought of it and that others see, and hear, and want to know more!

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