My recent brush with the Law

 

You know that sinking feeling you get when you look in your rear-view mirror and see a police car with lights flashing?  And you heard the siren before you saw it?  And then the next feeling is supposed to be relief because you pull to the side and the police car zooms on past?

Well, I got the first of those feelings without the second a couple of weeks ago, when I got my first speeding ticket in quite a few years.

No doubt I was guilty. 30 in a 20. I hadn’t noticed the change, thought I was keeping up with traffic; you know the drill.

So I pulled over, put the car in Park, put my hands on the steering wheel, and waited.

We had a fine conversation. I kept hoping that I might be let off with a warning. Might have, except it was in a school zone.  I guess I want no tolerance in a school zone. Maybe even more than I want a citation.

I can’t say I have been stopped a lot of times.  I also can’t say that I have always thought that stopping me and writing me a citation was really the best thing to do.  So, I rolled a stop sign, but there was NO ONE else on the road! Oh, yeah, except that parked police car down the street….

For all the times I’ve been stopped, maybe ten over the 35+ years I have been driving, I have always been treated well.

Judging from ONLY my own experience, I cannot make any sense of the challenges our society currently faces over policing.

On the other hand, there are too many stories, and too many incidents, for me to believe that there is not a problem.

But I am absolutely convinced of this: the problem is not the police, and the problem is not one particular race or class of people. The problem is us; the problem is in and with all of us, and until we can all admit that, I do not expect the problem will get any better.

And I don’t know anyone who wants things to keep going like they are. I don’t believe there is anyone who wants things to keep going like they are. But when, and how, are we going to get past the fear and hashtags that frame all of this?

Who is willing to stop vilifying the other, WHOEVER the “other” might be?

I am going to try. Wouldn’t you agree it is worth a try?

If it is worth a try, would you also agree that it has to start with ME trying, and YOU trying, not waiting around for THEM to try?

That’s from my recent brush with the Law. May your next brush with the law be at least as smooth as mine.

 

We’re right there with you, Miley

Here I am, a week after all the other bloggers have had their say on the Miley Cyrus at the VMAs incident. I can’t say I have followed it all closely enough to comment.  I didn’t watch the VMAs and never have.  It’s not that I am opposed to music or music videos; they (music videos) have just never hooked me.

But when I saw this  this morning, I was intrigued, so I read it.  I wasn’t drawn in my the f word, nor will include it here.  The quote that got me, and that sprung “blog fodder” into my head, was this:

everyone does dumb stuff when they are messed up.

Yes, everyone does.  We are all right there with you, Miley.

Of course, few of us have lived most of our lives in the celebrity spotlight.  There are other details about your life that some of my readers will know because they grew up “with” you in a sense.

In the interview you gave, you acknowledge that your life has been very messed up.  While I likely cannot imagine the degree and specifics therein, I can empathize. I, too, have lived a very messed up life.

And here is where some want me to say something like: “then I gave my heart to Jesus and everything got better.”

Well, kinda.

Ok, not really.  Right after I gave my heart to Jesus things did get better.  But the shine wore off and had, for a couple of decades, and life that looked great but was still rather messed up.

What turned it around?  a couple of things, honestly.  First, therapy.  I admitted to myself that I needed professional help and found it is a therapist I could trust. Second, I began to live more honestly and openly in relationship with the community of people I had around me.

These people were my church. So, yes; to those of you who thought I shrugged off Jesus a couple of paragraphs above, I do credit Jesus for the community in which I have, over the past 15 or so years, been learning to deal with and find healing for, all the “messed up” aspects of my life.

Simply put, Miley: we ALL do dumb stuff when we are messed up, and we are all, or at least have been, messed up.

Here’s hoping and praying you don’t wait until your mid 30s to take on the work of finding healing.